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Posts About Medical Career Jobs

If you’re Looking to Change Careers, Consider Medical Coding

If you’re Looking to Change Careers, Consider Medical Coding

A career in the medical field can be extremely rewarding, and as a large segment of the population ages, the need for medical professionals will only increase. If you’re interested in changing careers and pursuing a medical job, why not consider medical coding? It’s a career that’s in demand, in a rapidly growing industry, and it offers many advantages. Medical coding allows for a flexible schedule. Many medical coders work from home, which allows them to spend more time with their families, even while holding a full-time job. While some of these jobs require coders to work on-site at the beginning of their career, the job is flexible enough that it can easily be done remotely. Working from home means there’s no dress code, and you can make your own schedule. If working from home doesn’t appeal to you, there are other ways flexibility is beneficial. Many of the institutions that hire medical coders are open 24 hours a day, which means that whether you work best in the morning or at night, there’s a shift to suit your schedule and meet your needs. There’s no lack of work environments from which to choose. Where do medical coders find employment? They work in doctors’ offices and clinical settings, hospitals, outpatient surgery centers, home healthcare services, and nursing home facilities, healthcare management companies and educational institutes. In fact, an experienced medical coder can even become self-employed. There’s no shortage of jobs for medical coders. It’s an evergreen industry that’s rapidly growing because of the increasing number of medical procedures and tests analyzed by health insurance companies, regulators, courts, and consumers....
What does a Pharmacy Technician Do?

What does a Pharmacy Technician Do?

If you’ve ever watched people bustling around in a pharmacy, you’ve probably concluded that it’s an interesting place to work. Working in a pharmacy is a good way to get involved in medicine without doing clinical work, dealing with things like blood and medical procedures. If you’re interested in being a pharmacist, becoming a pharmacy technician is a great way to get your feet wet. What does a pharmacy technician do? Pharmacy technicians have many responsibilities. Working side by side with the pharmacist, they enter, fill and sell prescription medications. Additionally, pharmacy technicians perform important organizational tasks to keep the pharmacy running smoothly, like inventory and stocking shelves. A certified pharmacy technician can work in a wide range of places, including hospitals, clinics, commercial drug stores, and senior living communities. Do you think you have what it takes to be a pharmacy technician? While some training programs can take up to two years, at ABC Training Center, you can prepare for your pharmacy technician certification in NYC in as little as four weeks. During that time, a variety of topics are covered, including drug regulation and control, pharmaceutical terminology, medication calculations, basic biopharmaceutics, routes and formulations, and personal standards training. Some important areas of instruction include: Screening of prescription and medication orders Calculations and dosage forms Medication distribution Personal interaction skills and responsibilities Drug usage indications and possible side effects Students who complete their pharmacy technician training at ABC Training Center face the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board national certification exam with confidence. Once certified, they are able to earn a higher rate of pay than non-certified technicians. What’s more,...
The Importance of an EKG/Phlebotomy Technician

The Importance of an EKG/Phlebotomy Technician

If you’re considering a career in EKG/Phlebotomy, do it! EKG and phlebotomy are two of the fastest growing occupations in the healthcare industry. What’s more, the job market is only going to continue to get stronger for those in the EKG and phlebotomy field as baby boomers age. So what does an EKG/Phlebotomy technician do? The jobs are similar, in that they involve working with people and running diagnostic tests. They differ, though, in that a phlebotomist draws blood, while an EKG technician works with EKG equipment. While training for a career in EKG and phlebotomy, students learn different phlebotomy techniques like the vacuum method for venous blood withdrawal, the proper use of a microhematocrit centrifuge and a hemoglobinometer, how to obtain a hemoglobin level, an autolet blood withdrawal for glucose level, and more. They’re also taught how to identify and label the parts of diagnostic laboratory equipment as well as basic skills in the context of therapeutic and lab procedures. Students are trained to perform electrocardiographs under the supervision of a physician and obtain specimens prescribed by licensed healthcare departments How much training does an EKG/Phlebotomist need? Surprisingly, a student can complete the training with just 96 classroom hours. At ABC Training Center, this can be accomplished in four weeks of class time. Since 1972, ABC Training Center has been serving students in the New York City Community, training countless professionals for real, in-demand careers. A healthcare training institute NYC students trust, ABC has nationally certified programs that prepare students to work in any medical setting. Our training programs offer students superior training based on the latest technological...
Careers in Medical Coding: Physician Office Billing

Careers in Medical Coding: Physician Office Billing

The medical profession evolves rapidly, changing as discoveries and technologies bring new treatment methods and approaches. No matter how much the field of medicine shifts, however, one thing remains the same: doctors need to bill their patients. Whether a physician provides services in their own office, in an inpatient hospital setting or an outpatient facility, a separate bill is generated for that physician’s services. That’s why a career in medical coding is a good move; physician’s office billing is something that will never become obsolete. Is there a difference between medical billing and coding? Medical coders use current procedural terminology (CPT) to assign codes to the procedures a patient has received. They also refer to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD to choose diagnosis codes to label the patient’s condition. These codes are important because they’re going to be used by the insurance company to process the patient’s claims. Coders often have to coordinate with medical staff to ensure the accuracy of their information. Medical billers are responsible for entering codes into software and processing insurance claims. Making use of billing software, they input codes assigned by coders along with other important insurance information. Billers have to understand the claims process. They often get insurance information directly from the patients, explain benefits to patients and answer questions about insurance. Once the claims have been submitted, billers are responsible for making sure medical bills are paid. This can involve explaining to patients their coverage and responsibilities as well as talking with the insurer to determine any issues with timely payment. If an insurance claim is rejected or denied, it’s the...
Resume Tips for Getting a Career in Medical Billing and Coding

Resume Tips for Getting a Career in Medical Billing and Coding

Creating a resume can be an intimidating task. While it’s easy to find a template, it’s sometimes difficult to know exactly what and how much information to include. Employers receive many resumes from people seeking the same position, so it’s important to make yours stand out from the crowd. When you’re building a resume for the purpose of getting a medical billing or coding position, you should be aware that many employers are looking for people with both skill sets. Both professions communicate medically necessary information by translating medical documentation into standardized codes. Medical billing jobs focus on providing accurate, timely reimbursement, while medical coding jobs are focused on providing a complete picture of a medical encounter. Both professions work to provide accurate information, though medical coders deal in a wider variety of codes and medical billers know more about commercial insurance requirements and matters pertaining to filing claims. When building your first resume, don’t be discouraged by your lack of experience. Sometimes, new graduates possess knowledge of more up-to-date technology and practices than people who have been out of school for a while. Instead of being concerned about your experience, focus on making your resume look as professional as possible. Keep it simple. At the top of your resume, list your name and accurate contact information. Get an email address for business correspondence to provide a more professional appearance. If you would like to include an objective, keep it down to one or two sentences. Keep the font simple and consistent, check your resume for spelling and grammatical errors, and use relevant keywords to make your resume stand...
How to be Successful in Medical Jobs with Flexible Hours

How to be Successful in Medical Jobs with Flexible Hours

Modern technology has changed so many things, not the least of which is the workplace. Today, many jobs offer flexible hours, and this allows employees to strike a more successful work-life balance. Medical jobs with flexible hours can include medical billing or transcription, dental hygienist or medical office assistant jobs, and even RN positions. If you’re fortunate enough to choose a career in which flexible hours are a reality, make sure you know the expectations and can successfully manage your time. Working a job with flexible hours doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll work fewer hours. If your workload requires forty hours each week, you’ll have to put in the hours even if you don’t follow a traditional schedule. On the other hand, there are jobs for which the primary requirement is the completion of assignments, rather than putting in a certain amount of time. Make sure you understand what’s expected of your particular position. A non-rigid schedule may simply mean a change in timing. Sometimes the schedule simply shifts so that you come in an hour earlier and leave an hour earlier than other employees, or, conversely, begin and end your day an hour later. Other employers offer compressed schedules, in which you might work four days a week, but ten hours each day, rather than five days of eight-hour Telecommuting is a great way to reduce office hours. Many employers are embracing the concept of telecommuting because it can save money otherwise spent on office space and the associated expenses. On the employee side, telecommuting has been shown to increase productivity and reduce stress. The most flexible jobs allow...